Camping and Guns Don't Mix Well

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The ability to carry a concealed weapon in national parks was signed into law by President Barack Obama. Here's what that law does NOT cover.

ArmyCorpsOfEngineersSome people get confused or simply don't understand how the whole, "Federal Property" laws work, or what the terms mean. Lets take a look for instance, at Black Butte Resort in Corning, CA.

Black Butte Reservoir: Orland Buttes, Buckhorn Resort are all controlled by the federal government.  The law enforcement officers that patrol the area along with the Tehama County Sheriff are federal officers.  The "park" staff are all federal employees.  Seems to me that we can carry there.

Yellowstone National Park: All of the areas are controlled by the same federal employees as Black Butte Lake.

So, what's the difference?  Where am I going with this?  Well, if I ever go to Yellowstone National Park I will have my sidearm on, loaded, concealed and ready to use to defend myself and my family.  When I go to Black Butte Reservoir I will be unarmed, no guns in the tent, no guns in the car and I will yell REAL loud if I need to defend myself.

I personally know a lot of people who now carry when they go to Black Butte. Here's why they shouldn't:

Unlike Whiskeytown Lake, which is a national recreation area operated by our National Park Service, Black Butte Reservoir is operated by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE).  And guess what? They have their own rules. 

Unlike most federal land where you can take your gun onto the property, lakes, shorelines, forest, etc. The ACOE strictly forbids this behavior. Not only can you NOT bring your firearm into any of the buildings, you can't even have it ON the property.  This includes locked boxes, safes, cars, boats, campsites, nothing... nadda! Furthermore, their property is described to include the water that is held back by the dams that the ACOE controls.  That's trillions of gallons of water that we can navigate around, so long as we're unarmed while we do it.

 The one state where there is an exception to this rule is Idaho.  This is only because a couple in Idaho sued the ACOE for their overreaching law. Unfortunately, they only mentioned Idaho in the suit so the rest of us were not helped.

If you want to learn more about the law you can click here to read it for yourself.  Please keep in mind that there has been case law surrounding this that defines what is considered their property as mentioned above.

If this article was educational, entertaining, enlightening or boring, please rate it so others know if they should read it too.  Thanks and carry responsibly!

36 CFR 327.13 - EXPLOSIVES, FIREARMS, OTHER WEAPONS AND FIREWORKS.

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